A Typical Day in Social Media

Everyone’s day looks different. We each have our own responsibilities and tasks that we have to do. Social media consumes a fair bit of time for most small businesses, especially if you are doing it right. You have to stay on top of what people are saying about your small business, and respond to any comments or mentions that happen on your social media networks. So what does a typical day look like?

Facebook—30 minutes

  • Post a status update.
  • Respond to messages and anything posted on your wall.
  • Post on the wall of friends and fans.
  • Find new friends or businesses to fan.
  • Send a personal message to someone.

Twitter—30 minutes

  • Find new people to follow.
  • Schedule 3-5 tweets using Buffer, Hootsuite or other program.
  • Respond to @ replies and direct messages.
  • Send a direct message to one of my followers.
  • Ask followers to follow one of my followers.

LinkedIn—30-45 minutes

  • Connect with new people, or ask for a connection.
  • Send a message to a connection, or even better, schedule a phone conversation or in-person meeting.
  • Review groups and respond to questions.
  • Post a question in a group.

Other Tasks—1 hour

  • Review Quora and forums, respond to questions.
  • Post a question on your preferred platform.
  • Review and respond to any social media mentions or online mentions (Social Mention, Google Alerts, etc.)

Those are some fairly typical social media tasks done every weekday. When you do them is not as important as actually making sure they happen. There are some optimal times to post content for certain social media networks, but with scheduling tools you can free yourself to do that when you want and when it makes sense for your business or industry. It is a good idea to check the social networks you are most active on a couple of times a day, say in the morning and late afternoon.

For a small business owner, social media can easily consume half of your day, and even more if you on several social networks like Google+, Pinterest or other social media networks. Focusing on the social media networks that give you the best return for the time you spend is the key to being successful.

You may consider hiring someone to help you, though often the resources are available with existing employees. You might find that one of your employees has a penchant for a particular social media network and you can make her responsible for it. I recommended this strategy to one of my clients that did not have the budget to hire someone new.

The employee was excited to do it that simply being known in the office as “the person in charge of Facebook” was enough compensation (I found out later that her overall performance improved too). You will need to have a good guidelines for this person in how they respond to comments and questions, what they post, and what the overall tone and direction of the business should be for that social media network, but you probably already have that (or you should, if you don’t).

The key is to make sure that you are actively controlling your message across the web and social media networks. Do not allow mentions of your business go without a response—thanking someone for mentioning your small business, providing clarification, offering assistance, or providing support. Staying on top of your social media activities is time consuming, but the return can be very good.

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